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Posts from the ‘Advocacy’ Category

Salt Lake City Launches Ambitious New Climate Plan

 

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Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski and City Council have committed to a Joint Resolution to transition the community to 100 percent renewable electricity sources by 2032 and an 80 percent  reduction in carbon emissions by 2040.

The Mayor and City Councilmember Erin Mendenhall were joined by other City leaders and community members on the steps of the City and County Building today to announce the resolution.

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“This is the most ambitious step ever taken by Salt Lake City to address the threat of climate change,” said Mayor Biskupski.  “This commitment places the City among leading communities worldwide that acknowledge our responsibility to rapidly reduce emissions and forge a new path forward that protects our economies, societies and overall human well-being.”

Salt Lake City had previously committed to 100 percent renewable electricity sources for its government operations, along with major carbon reductions for City operations, but this resolution expands the scope to include all electricity and emissions on a community scale.

The Joint Resolution cited the scientific consensus that climate change is occurring and being driven by the burning of fossil fuels.  The Resolution also acknowledged local impacts such as changes in water systems and extreme weather events that are affecting Salt Lake City now and will be exacerbated in the future.

“We can tackle this challenge and deliver clean energy solutions that will simultaneously improve air quality, protect public health and deliver local jobs.  Leading on climate change today is an obligation we all share with each other and to future generations,” stated Mayor Biskupski.

Visit www.slcgreen.com/climatepositive for more information about the plan.

See the full Carbon Reduction Joint Resolution here.

The State of Salt Lake City’s Air

-As I have said before, there is nothing more important than the air we breathe. And working to clear our skies is a top priority of my administration.- (1)

Today the American Lung Association released its 17th annual State of the Air report, which ranks the air quality in our nation’s cities and counties. Salt Lake City, Provo and Orem ranked 6th for short-term particulate exposure.

Mayor Biskupski has announced an aggressive air quality platform that aims to drastically reduce pollution through improving energy efficiency in buildings, increasing use of renewable energy like solar, sourcing cleaner vehicles, and creating a robust clean air network focused on advancing clean air legislation.

Join the City of Salt Lake and do your part to reduce pollution!

Stay informed.

Take action even on voluntary air days. This is when we have the best chance to keep our air cleaner, longer – especially when we know that an inversion has set up in the valley.

Skip and reduce trips.
 

  • Aim to leave your car parked, one more day a week. Modern vehicles emit the vast majority of trip pollution in those first two minutes on the road. Skipping car trips by using public transportation, arranging a carpool or other alternatives make a measurable impact.
  • On days you must drive, chain your trips together to reduce “cold start” pollution.

Explore Salt Lake City on public transit. Ride UTA can help you plan your next transit adventure.

Commit to being idle free! This is one of the easiest things you can do to have a positive impact. Idling wastes gas and money and adds unnecessary pollution into our air. Plus when you idle, you’re exposing yourself and your passengers to higher levels of harmful pollutants.

Skip the fire! Burning wood, whether in your fireplace or fire pit, has a huge impact on our air quality. One fireplace can emit as much particulate pollution as 90 sport utility vehicles.

Get active. Biking is a great way to get some exercise and limit your impact on air quality. The Bicycle Collective shares some great tips in this UCAIR spotlight.

Take the Clear the Air Challenge!  Find new ways to drive down your miles and measure your impact.

Increase the energy efficiency of your home.

  • Weatherize your home, and cash in on Rocky Mountain Power and Questar Adding insulation and upgrading your windows will not only save you money on your utility bills, it will keep your home warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer.
  • Upgrade your furnace and water heater. Rebates are available for residents who upgrade their furnace and water heaters. Water heaters are a significant source of NOx emissions and that adds to Utah’s wintertime PM 2.5, problem.
  • Swap out your lightbulbs to LEDs. By replacing your home’s five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with ENERGY STAR rating, you can save $75 each year.

 Opt for people powered or electric tools for yard work. 

  • Get exercise while doing yard work by using push mowers instead of gas powered lawn mowers. According to the U.S. EPA, a new gas lawn mower produces as many VOCs and NOx emissions in in in one hour as 11 new cars.
  • Not able to use a push mower or manual tools? Look for electric alternatives to mowers, leaf blowers and weed whackers.

Install Solar! Installing solar on your home does not have to be overly complex or costly. Check out Solar Simplified and find out how to start the process. If you aren’t able to install rooftop solar, keep an eye out for Rocky Mountain Power’s Subscriber Solar program launching soon!

 

 

 

 

Citizens’ Climate Lobby Brings the Wild West Together for Regional Conference

Citizens’ Climate Lobby hosted it’s 2016 Wild West Regional Conference in Salt Lake City this past weekend.  The event was rich with information about legislation, advanced communication, climate science and more.

Highlights included a panel discussion on exerting political influence with panelists Mayor Jackie Biskupski, Patrice Arent, Member of the Utah State House of Representatives, and Robert Axson, Central State Director for Senator Mike Lee.  Panelists emphasized the importance of building relationships across the political spectrum.

Mark Reynolds, Executive Director of Citizens’ Climate Lobby lead several informative and inspirational sessions focused around CCL’s mission to create the political will for climate solutions by enabling individual breakthroughs in the exercise of personal and political power.

Another panel discussion titled Broadening our Reach to Under Represented Groups consisted of presentations by Piper Christian, high school student and COP21 attendee, on engaging young people on climate change, Nate Salazar on speaking to the Hispanic population, Dave Christian, Psychologist, on communicating with other political views, and Susan Soleil on Faith Communities and the Moral Imperative for Climate Justice. These panelists encouraged increasing diversity in political involvement by including young people, minorities, and people of faith.

The keynote presentation featured Dr. Rob Davies, physicist, Utah Climate Center, Utah State University speaking on ways to communicate about climate change that resonate with people’s emotions so that they feel motivated to take action.  The conference also included an evening performance by The Crossroads Project. This multi-media presentation combined video, classical music by the Fry Street Quartet, and monologue by Rob Davies about climate change science.

To learn more about Citizens’ Climate Lobby, visit their webpage.

 

Wild West Citizens’ Climate Lobby Regional Conference March 18-20

By SLCgreen Intern Alicia Chen

On March 18th through the 20th, Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL) will be putting on their Wild West regional conference in downtown Salt Lake City. This annual event brings together members and welcomes newcomers from the Wild West region (Arizona, Colorado, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming) to meet and to participate in various in-depth workshops. These sessions will feature panel discussions and training on topics ranging from climate science to advanced communications training that will increase understanding, develop skills, and promote collaborations around common concerns we face in this area. The keynote speaker will be Physicist, Dr. Rob Davies from Utah Climate Center who will discuss how to communicate about climate change in a way that resonates and motivates people to take action. For those new to CCL and interested in getting involved, the conference starts off with a Climate Advocate Training and Group Start Workshop on Saturday to learn about the group’s efforts, goals, and methods.

Panels and events include:
• CCL leaders from each state addressing area-specific issues and strategies used to influence Members of Congress.
• Breakout Sessions on climate and health, a writers workshop, exerting political influence, broadening reach to include under-represented groups, how to use social media effectively.
• A social gathering to meet other members on Friday with live music, drink, and appetizers and a performance on Saturday by The Crossroads Project.

CCL is an advocacy organization dedicated to addressing climate change through national policies. They train and support volunteers to engage elected officials, the media, and the public. Interested in learning how to influence policies or getting involved? Visit the event page for additional details and to register.

Early registration is $65 and is now open until February 19th, registration after the 19th is $75. Registration fee covers all sessions, the Crossroads Project performance, as well as lunch and dinner on Saturday. There is no charge for the newcomer Advocate Training and Group Start Workshop on Saturday. The conference will take place at The Chase Mill at Tracy Aviary (589 E. 1300 S. SLC, UT 84105) and at the Wasatch Retreat and Conference Center at the Episcopal Church.