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Posts tagged ‘young farmers’

Round Three of Funding for Sustainable Farming Now Open

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 22, 2018

Salt Lake City and Urban Food Connections Announce Round Three of Funding for Local Food Microgrant Program

 

BUG

BUG Farms, a recipient of the first funding round from the Local Food Microgrant Program.

Applications are now open for local commercial farmers to seek assistance in expanding their operation and production of more organically-grown fruits and vegetables.

Salt Lake City launched the Local Food Microgrant Program in February 2017 in partnership with Urban Food Connections of Utah, the non-profit organization that runs the Downtown Farmers Market, Rio Grande Winter Market and Tuesday Harvest Market. The Salt Lake City Council, on the recommendation of the Administration and its Sustainability Department, in 2016 set apart $85,000 to initially fund the program.

The program offers funding to local farmers who want to expand their operations with sustainability in mind. The grants help farmers access technology, education, tools and equipment to grow more sustainable produce.

“Our goal is to increase the amount of healthy, locally-grown, organic food available in Salt Lake City,” said Mayor Jackie Biskupski. “By providing small grants to farmers, we are also supporting local, ecologically sustainable agriculture and the City’s economy.”

The third funding round is now open and will award $15,000. The microgrant program has so far generated substantial interest among small-scale commercial farmers. Read more

New Incubator Farm Launches this Spring

FarmBanner

Ponder this:

For every one farmer and rancher under the age of 25, there are five who are 75 or older, according to the Department of Agriculture.  If we do not support new and beginning farmers, who will grow our food into the future?

The Green Urban Lunchbox project is starting a new incubator (or community) farm in Layton, Utah this spring. What was once an abandoned orchard will be brought back to life as a place for new farmers to have access to land, water, tools and training.

“This is a great chance for people to get into farming, without all the cost,” says Green Urban Lunchbox founder and director Shawn Peterson. “Our plots will run from $150-500 a year and range in size from 1/8th of an acre to 1 acre.” Read more