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Posts tagged ‘water’

Mayor Becker Discusses Air Quality, Energy and Water

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Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker talks with P3 Utah in a recent podcast.

“Ralph Becker, Mayor of Salt Lake City, Utah,  visits with Steve Klass of P3 Utah about his work developing a world class livable city. Mayor Becker explains his accomplishments in terms of focus on air quality, setting net zero energy efficiency standards for buildings and watershed and recreation protection as part of the recently adopted Mountain Accord.

He explains the roles of local government, state and federal government in carrying out sustainability initiatives.  He explains the challenges he is leading the City to meet in continuing progress and expresses a desire for greater public engagement.  He says that there are trade-offs and learning at a community level necessary to live differently in order to truly make our metropolitan area more sustainable and adapt successfully to climate change. Listen and be inspired!”

Listen to the podcast here.

Volunteer along the Jordan River!

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Be a part of the biggest volunteer project of the year along the Jordan River Parkway!

Volunteer on Thursday morning, May 14th from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.  You can even “Get into the River” with canoe-based river cleanup in addition to trail-side service projects!

Jordan River Commission is providing each volunteer with:

  • One free ticket to a Real Monarchs game on May 16th
  • 40% off registration fees for the Jordan River Marathon (Full, Half and 5K)
  • A ticket for an opportunity drawing on May 30, 2015
  • A chance to win the Thistle Wrangler award for the most invasive thistle plants removed

Sign up to volunteer and join the fun here!

JordanRiverCleanUpEvent

Mayor Becker Takes Action to Protect City Water Supply in Face of Climate Change Impacts

Register for a free

Water conservation starts at home! Register for a free sprinkler check by calling 1-877-728-3420.

SALT LAKE CITY – Mayor Ralph Becker is working to protect Salt Lake City’s water supply in the face of another year of below average snow levels and spring run-off for Salt Lake City by declaring a Stage 1 Advisory in accordance with the Salt Lake City Water Shortage Contingency Plan. A Stage 1 Advisory calls for water customers to be watchful in regards to water use by avoiding overwatering and water waste.

The Salt Lake City Public Utilities Department is closely monitoring water supply levels and demand patterns to determine if further declarations are warranted. While the City’s current overall water supply is about 90 percent of normal, stream flows are very low, prompting the Stage 1 Advisory.

“This careful water management approach is part of our overall efforts to adapt to, and mitigate, the impacts of climate change that are already upon us,” said Mayor Becker. “Conservation, efficiency and sustainability guide how we approach all our goals for the City and I hope residents will join us in this effort.”

“Unfortunately, Salt Lake City is not immune to the realities of the climate change crisis and our recent below average snow fall is a clear sign of that. We are doing everything we can to address this problem for the short and long term.”

Mayor Becker has been actively working to address climate change at both the local and national level for many years.  In addition to implementing a wide array of cutting-edge sustainability practices in Salt Lake City, Mayor Becker also served on the White House Climate Change Task Force which developed recommendations for the federal government on mitigating the damage caused by climate change in local communities like Salt Lake City.

“Last year, we were able to carry over a portion of our water allocation and save it in our reservoirs in the event of another year of below average snowpack,” said Salt Lake City Public Utilities Director Jeff Niermeyer.  “This year’s snow levels mean that it is important to maintain that goal of reserving water for future need, should this pattern of low snow fall and runoff continue into next year.”

The Water Shortage Contingency Plan outlines five water shortage stages triggered by water supply levels, stream flows, and water demand. It also provides recommendations for actions within each stage aimed at reducing water demand to levels that reflect current supply and future water needs.

Public Utilities offers these simple recommendations for using less water:

  • Adjust sprinkler controllers to reflect the season and weather
  • Check sprinkler systems for broken or misaligned spray heads
  • Check indoor faucets and fixtures for leaks and repair promptly
  • Sign up for a free sprinkler check by calling 1-877-728-3420
  • Visit http://slcgardenwise.com/ for water-saving tips and landscape information

For more information on how to reduce water use or to view the Water Shortage Contingency Plan, visit www.slcgov.com/waterconservation or contact Stephanie Duer, Water Conservation Manager at 801-483-6860 or stephanie.duer@slcgov.com.

Your Utah. Your Future. Take the Survey!

 

Envision Utah needs 50,000 Utahns like you to help make history and participate in the Your Utah Your Future project. Over the past few months, they have been using your input from the BUILD YOUR 2050 UTAH WEB APP and working with more than 400 task force members to create a survey to find out what you want Utah to be like in 2050.

Take a few seconds now and reserve your spot in the survey. Envision Utah will send you a link to the online survey when it goes live this spring.

Learn more about the Your Utah Your Future initiative below, or visit EnvisionUtah.org.

EnvisionUtah - Infographic

 

 

City Urges Water Conservation, But Predicts No Local Shortages in Year Ahead

Photo Credit: Arbyreed via Flickr.

Little Cottonwood Canyon. Photo Credit: Arbyreed via Flickr.

With the warmer than normal temperatures at the beginning of 2015 and current snowpack levels below average, Mayor Ralph Becker and the Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities remind residents to use water efficiently.  While snow levels are below average, Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities does not anticipate a local water shortage this year.

This is the result of the proactive water resource stewardship approach Salt Lake City has taken, which includes investing in infrastructure to provide water storage and actively monitoring and managing water resources. The Salt Lake community’s pattern of improved water conservation is also a significant factor.

“We are always closely monitoring our water supplies,” said Jeff Niermeyer, Director of Salt Lake City’s Department of Public Utilities. “Salt Lake City’s infrastructure investments and forethought in planning, and our community’s continued water conservation efforts, should ensure an adequate supply of water for this year.”

Regardless of the current City water supply, weather variability can make predicting next year’s snowpack and precipitation difficult. There is never have enough water to waste, and therefore it is important that residents and business owners always use water wisely. Public Utilities will be posting periodic updates on local snowpack levels and the water supply outlook on its website at www.slcgov.com/utilities and at www.facebook.com/slcpu.

Even though recent record breaking warm temperatures made it feel like spring, the winter season is still upon us and the City does not recommend turning on lawn sprinklers. However, now is a good time to start planning for water efficient gardens.

Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is pleased to announce a free online tool to help you achieve an enjoyable and water efficient garden. SLC Gardenwise is a new, interactive water-wise landscape website.

“SLC Gardenwise is an interactive website that includes virtual garden tours, an extensive plant database, watering how-to’s and other resources,” said Stephanie Duer, Water Conservation Manager for Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities.

Designed to provide information and inspiration for either the home gardener or landscape professional, the site provides a virtual tour of beautiful, water-wise landscapes, as well as technical information on site design, pest management, landscape maintenance and, of course, watering practices. Visit www.slcgardenwise for more information.

A Blueprint for the Central Wasatch Mountains

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The legacy of the Central Wasatch Mountains, one of Utah’s most valuable resources, could be lost unless action is taken today.

Increasing population and visitation, sprawling development, congestion and a changing climate are putting more and more pressure on these mountains. Mountain Accord was established to make critical decisions designed to address these threats and ensure long-term vitality for generations to come.

After more than a year of researching, collaborating and considering public input,

Mountain Accord has released a proposed Blueprint for the Central Wasatch

that addresses and balances the future of environment, recreation, transportation and economy in the Central Wasatch and proposes specific actions to be made in each area. Now it’s up to you to weigh in on this proposal and help shape the future of the Central Wasatch.

Visit mountainaccord.com between now and March 16 to read the proposed Blueprint and answer a short questionnaire.

Additional opportunities for the public to learn and weigh in are listed below:

Proposed Blueprint Q&A
Wednesday, Feb. 11
6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
Cottonwood High School Auditorium (use north entrance)
5715 South 1300 East Murray, UT 84106

Proposed Blueprint Q&A and Open House*
Tuesday, Feb. 24
Q&A: 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
Open House: 7:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Black Box Theater, Eccles Center for the Performing Arts
1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, UT 84090

Proposed Blueprint Open House
Wednesday, Feb. 25
6:00 – 8:30 p.m.
Skyline High School Cafeteria (use main entrance)
3251 East 3760 South Salt Lake City, UT 84109

*Please note that the Park City event has been rescheduled from Feb. 10.

Comments may also be emailed to comment@mountainaccord.com or mailed to:

Mountain Accord
375 West 200 South, Ste. 275
Salt Lake City, UT 84101

Please take the time to share this post with your friends, family and co-workers. The future of the Central Wasatch is in your hands!

Help Shape the Future of the Wasatch Mountains!

Photo Credit: Steve_W via Flickr.

Photo Credit: Steve_W via Flickr.

The Mountain Accord is a collaborative public process to make long-term decisions and take action regarding transportation, environment, recreation, and economy in the central Wasatch Mountains (between I-80 and Little Cottonwood Canyon).

Your input is crucial to this important process! Comments are currently begin accepted on MountainAccord.com until November 20. Respond to a short questionnaire about the ideal scenarios for transportation, environment, recreation and economy.

Mountain Accord Public Comment Period Opens!