Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘waste’

Le Croissant: Caterers with a Green Mission

Businesses around Salt Lake City are “greening” their operations with the help of our e2 programLe Croissant Catering is one of those success stories we just had to share!

LeCroissantCatering

From purchasing renewable energy through the Blue Sky program, to retrofitting their workspace with high-efficiency lighting, and now exploring options for a more efficient heating and cooling system, Le Croissant has worked diligently to reduce their environmental impact. Of all the changes that this company has made, perhaps the most notable is the sustainability efforts to green their waste stream. Previously, items like food waste, disposable utensils, and basic trash materials were put into an overflowing dumpster and everything was sent to the landfill.

Through consultation with Momentum Recycling, another e2 business member, Le Croissant’s now saves 90% of waste from the landfill. They do this with separate containers for mixed stream recycling, green waste, glass, & landfill. This not only allows for Le Croissant to maximize the amount of material that gets recycled, but director Chris Sanchez says that it has made the waste pick-up area of the business much cleaner.

Avoid the landfill
Of course, such a dramatic transformation of their waste stream required that the employees be educated about what can be recycled, and how to ensure that the correct material finds its way into the proper receptacles. Le Croissant accomplished this by placing clearly marked signs on various containers throughout the kitchen and office spaces so that each employee can see what goes in each container.

Changes were made in the kitchen, too. Employees have access to a large container within arm’s reach where they can put food scraps that will be transferred to the green waste containers. Sanchez says that the employees have fully embraced this new model, and appreciate that the company has made recycling a business priority.

Temporary Food Waste Bin

However, as a catering business, much of their work takes place off-site, away from their array of recycling containers. They continue their efforts off-site by using their own re-usable plates and utensils whenever possible to minimize the production of waste. When this is not an option, Le Croissant features biodegradable materials made from bamboo and corn starch.

Le Croissant also works with local farmers to provide local ingredients in their food, and they make a conscientious effort to partner with other organizations that prioritize sustainability practices.

All of these efforts have proven not only important to the staff of Le Croissant, but to their clients as well. Sanchez says that many of their new clients have approached them not only for their excellent services as a catering company, but because of their strong sustainability commitment. Likewise, many of their previous clients have maintained their loyalty to the company based on these efforts.

LeCroissantTeam

We’d like to thank Le Croissant for their bold and diligent contribution to sustainability practices and for paving the way for a greener Salt Lake City.

Recycle Snapshot: Pharmaceutical Waste

Pharmaceutical Waste

Status: Use caution

Likes: Nurses, doctors, helping others

About: Honestly, my only real life goal is to help people feel better. The tricky part is getting rid of me; you can’t just throw me out like you would for anything else. I won’t stand for it!

When we’re through, drop me off at any Salt Lake City Police station and they will dispose of me from there. NEVER flush me down the drain, I’ll cause all kinds of problems. Just remember — when dealing with me, it’s best we work together: I’ll help you, you help me. Agreed?

Recycle Snapshot: Styrofoam

styrofoam

Status:
Blue Bin

Interested in:
Chinese take-out

Likes:
Shipping, boxes, cold beverages

About:
I’m originally from Polysterene, but I’ve basically made my way around the entire world by now.

I can be super useful for everything, but then again, you’ll find it hard to get rid of me when you’ve had enough.

If you pitch me to the landfill, I can sit there and throw a fuss for over one million years (seriously!) But if you live in Salt Lake City, throw me in your curbside blue bin and I just might grow up to be some shiny, new plastic container.

Or better yet, a picture frame!

Nominate Your Business for a P2 Award!

Salt Lake City accepts a 2013 P2 Award for the net zero Public Safety Building.

Salt Lake City accepts a 2013 P2 Award for the net zero Public Safety Building.

Each year, the Utah Pollution Prevention (P2) Association issues “Outstanding Achievement in Pollution Prevention Awards” to organizations for excellence in pollution reduction practices. These awards recognize outstanding efforts that reduce risk to Utah’s environment or to public health. This can be done through practices, projects or activities that reduce pollution at the source or remove materials from the waste cycle.

Pollution prevention uses source reduction techniques to reduce risk to public health, safety, welfare, and the environment. Pollution prevention avoids transferring waste from one environmental medium (air, land, water) to another. Treating existing waste, installing equipment to comply with pollution control regulations, and energy recovery are not considered pollution prevention and will not be eligible for this award. Projects that focus on the environmental benefits of a product or service are not eligible.

The Utah P2 Association is requesting nominations for the 2014 Outstanding Achievement in Pollution Prevention Awards. Large Businesses or industry, small businesses or industry, and community involvement programs are eligible. Special consideration will be given to businesses or organizations demonstrating collaboration with other businesses and organizations, employee involvement, and innovation and initiation of new programs.

To be considered, organizations must be able to demonstrate excellence in pollution prevention practices for the calendar year of 2013. Reductions can be achieved through practices, projects or activities that reduce pollution at the source or remove materials from the waste cycle.

Who is Eligible?

  • Any individual
  • Environmental, community, educational, or non-profit organizations
  • Business
  • Industry
  • Agriculture
  • Trade or professional organizations
  • Local government

Entry Deadline: Friday, July 18, 2014

Awards Banquet: October 2014

Questions? Contact Paul Harding at (801) 536-4108 or pharding@utah.gov. 

P2 Awards Selection Criteria

  • Activities should be true pollution prevention, not pollution control or treatment. Acceptable activities include:
    • Facilities, program-wide and multimedia efforts, or outstanding projects.
    • Projects must reduce waste generation, pollutant emissions or other releases at the source; recycle materials or conserve water or energy.
  • Nominated program should use sound technology, be innovative and cost effective.
  • Environmental benefits should be demonstrated.
  • Applicant’s efforts, both inside and outside their organization, should promote pollution prevention as the preferred approach to protecting the environment and human health.
  • Measurable progress should have occurred during the calendar year of 2013.
  • Efforts should be able to serve as a model for other programs.
  • Efforts should be taken voluntarily (in advance of regulatory requirements), but can be an innovative response to regulatory programs.
  • Nominees should have a good overall environmental compliance record for two years prior to the nomination deadline.

Nomination Form

All nominees should submit a cover sheet, a one-page summary, and a narrative description. Optional supporting documentation, including charts, photographs, news clippings, news releases, publications, or other material may be included.

The cover sheet should include:

  • Nominee’s name, address, and telephone number(s);
  • Name, title and phone numbers(s) of a contact person to answer questions regarding the nomination;
  • Name, title, organization, address, and telephone number(s) of the person/organization submitting the nomination (if not self-nominated, please be sure to notify the nominee).

The summary should include a one-page overview of activities including dates when achievements occurred.

The narrative should include a description of:

  • The nominee: including background information, reasons for the project or program and number of individuals involved and their efforts;
  • Pollution prevention efforts, quantitative results of efforts, technological or managerial innovations, employee involvement, financial impact on operations, and costs and benefits (financial or otherwise). Helpful tools and information.

Submissions must be received by July 18 and sent to:

Pollution Prevention Awards
Utah Pollution Prevention Association
Attn: Paul Harding
P.O. Box 144810
Salt Lake City, Utah 84114-4810
(801) 536-4108 Fax: (801) 536-4457

Electronic submissions may be sent to pharding@utah.gov.

New Year’s Resolutions: Week #2

ScoreboardWeek2

 

The resolutions keep rolling in! What will you do this year to lower your impact?

Zero Waste Awards & Trashed Film Screening

Hosted by the Utah Recycling Alliance (URA)

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Brewvies Cinema Pub (677 South 200 West)

$5 admission includes one free drink ticket, two raffle tickets and an evening of entertainment! RSVP to the Facebook event.

Read more

Glass recycling made easy – we can do better than 6%!

This is a guest blog post by Katie McKeon of Momentum Recycling, Salt Lake City’s contracted glass recycling services provider.

non-alcoholic-medley

How many of these items do you consume?

glassrecyclingratesHere at Momentum Recycling, we often hear people say they don’t use much glass. Most people think of glass bottles and immediately think of alcoholic beverages. While we receive a fair share of this type of glass, there is also quite a bit of glass out there that goes unnoticed.  Recycling just one of these glass containers saves enough energy to:

  • Light a 100-watt light bulb for four hours
  • Power a computer for 30 minutes
  • Power a television for 20 minutes

Read more