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Posts tagged ‘waste and recycling’

Salt Lake City Thanks Frontline Waste & Recycling Staff in Celebration of Waste & Recycling Workers Week

June 15, 2021

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Salt Lake City Thanks Frontline Waste & Recycling Staff in Celebration of Waste & Recycling Workers Week

SALT LAKE CITY — Salt Lake City is thanking its frontline waste & recycling staff this week in honor of Waste & Recycling Workers Week which occurs annually the week of June 17.

Salt Lake City employs 55 men and women who are responsible for collecting the refuse from 42,000 homes and businesses every week. Their essential work is critical to residents’ health and safety, making Salt Lake City a cleaner, more resilient community every day. Every year, Salt Lake City crews empty between 4.7 to 4.8 million curbside bins. This year, Waste & Recycling collected an average of 3,630 tons of trash per month, 1,454 tons of compost per month, and 775 tons of recycling per month.

“Our City maintains its world-class beauty and high standard of cleanliness in large part due to the tireless daily efforts of the people who work in our Waste and Recycling Division,” said Mayor Mendenhall. “They are on the front line but work behind-the-scenes. We often don’t think twice when the trash, recycling, and yard waste seamlessly disappear from our curbs. So this week I encourage all residents to join me in thanking these public servants for their critical work. A simple wave as the truck rolls by really makes their days.”

Residents who wish to send a message may also call and leave a voicemail on the customer service line at 801-535-6999 or by sharing a message with @slcgreen on social media.

In addition to the operational staff, Salt Lake City’s Waste and Recycling Division includes an Education Team that works directly with residents, helping make sure recyclables and compostable materials end up in the right bins. In 2020, the Education Team checked 551,592 waste carts throughout the City, helping reduce contamination and empowering residents to know how to recycle correctly.

The Waste & Recycling customer service team also provides daily assistance to community members, which was even more critical throughout 2020 due to the “inland hurricane” and resulting debris cleanup, as well as general increased waste disposal needs as more Salt Lakers stayed home.

“Our crews have worked courageously and tirelessly throughout the entire pandemic and natural disasters to keep each other safe and deliver uninterrupted service to our residents,” said Chris Bell, Waste and Recycling Division Director. “I couldn’t be more proud of their resolve and ability to maintain our high service standards.”

On top of curbside collection, Salt Lake City Waste & Recycling provides resident support and education, the bulky waste collection program Call 2 Haul, special event waste and recycling permitting, and overseeing of the business recycling ordinance and construction and demolition recycling ordinance.

This year, the Call 2 Haul program collected an average of 168 tons of trash and 14 tons of recycling per month. In addition to their normal collection program, Call 2 Haul also assisted with Salt Lake City’s lawn mower exchange, picking up hundreds of gas-powered lawn mowers from residents who switched to electric mowers.

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How to Safely Dispose of Old Batteries

Batteries, whether alkaline or lithium, give us the power we need (literally) to keep everything from smoke detectors to our cell phones going. But when it comes time to throw away used batteries, it’s not always clear what to do.

All batteries consist of a combination of chemicals often including mercury, lead, cadmium, nickel and silver, all of which must be properly managed to prevent harm to individuals and the environment. While all batteries require careful disposal, lithium batteries can be particularly hazardous. When exposed to high pressure or high temperatures, that materials in a lithium battery degrade, allowing combustible chemicals to interact and ultimately causing fires.

Photo of bucket of batteries of different varieties waiting appropriate disposal.
Batteries aren’t all alike, and they require proper disposal.

It is uncommon for lithium batteries to pose a threat in our homes. However, if lithium batteries wind up in the recycling bin, they endanger the recycling crews, trucks, and recycling facilities. Compaction of a battery, especially in warmer times of year, could start a fire inside the truck.

Additionally, they pose a threat to crews collecting and sorting materials at the Materials Recovery Facility (MRF).

Not only can lithium batteries burn skin, they can start larger fires within trucks, MRFs and other facilities.

In fact, batteries cause hundreds of fires a year at recycling facilities around the country.

How to Properly Dispose of Batteries

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Your Yard Waste Container: Get the Dirt on Compost

by Salt Lake Valley Landfill Compost Marketer & Recycling Specialist, Zak Breckenridge

It’s variably called the “yard waste bin,” the “brown can,” or the “compost container.”

Whatever name you give it, all Salt Lake City Waste & Recycling customers have the familiar brown can and use it to dispose of leaves, yard trimmings, small branches, grass, weeds, and other green waste.

It can also take your fruit and vegetable scraps, eggshells, coffee grounds and filters, and tea bags.

Salt Lake City’s compost container . . . aka “yard waste bin” aka “brown can.”

Today we’re taking a deep dive into the brown can. We’re (figuratively, not literally) getting down and dirty not only with what should and shouldn’t go in your bin, but also what happens to all of that “green waste” at its destination?

Welcome to the world of compost and why we’re so proud to have a commercial compost facility here in the Salt Lake Valley, which services Salt Lake City and many Salt Lake County curbside programs.

What exactly is Compost?

We all know that putting carrot tops and tomato stems in the compost is somehow better than putting them in the trash, but how do your food scraps and yard waste become a useful and valuable natural product that’s also better for the environment and better for our community?

Fresh compost
A BIG pile of Salt Lake Valley’s Certified Compost
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(Mostly) Normal curbside waste collection on Monday, July 24th

 

There will be (mostly) normal** curbside waste collection on Monday, Pioneer Day, for the majority of the city. The normal curbside schedule will also be in effect the remainder of the week.

**However, if you live in the vicinity of the Pioneer Day Parade route, your collection may be delayed.

SLC’s Waste & Recycling Division has contacted a small number of residents who will have a delayed collection as a result of the Pioneer Day activities. If you did not receive a notice, your curbside collection will remain the same.

Areas in yellow, below, will not have curbside service on Monday. It will be delayed and collected on Tuesday, July 25th.

Map_2_Yellow

Yellow area: pickup delayed to July 25.

Thank you in advance for your understanding and cooperation as we strive to provide the safest and highest quality service to our residents.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact us at 801-535-6999.