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Posts tagged ‘tree utah’

Caring for SLC’s Trees

Salt Lake City’s urban forest suffered notable damage in the September 8 wind storm. The carefully maintained forest consists of nearly 85,000 public trees. 

Sadly, the City lost approximately 1,500 public trees from city parks, the cemetery, park strips, and medians. We estimate that another 3,000 public trees were damaged and are in need of repair– on top of the private trees from yards that were lost or damaged.

This is certainly a sad occurrence for our environment and community– especially if you lost a beloved tree.

However, as Urban Forester Tony Gliot describes in the video below, storms are a natural part of our ecosystem and we have the opportunity to come together and re-plant many of these trees that were lost.

Salt Lake City’s Urban Forestry Division works hard to care for our existing trees and to help plant more. Even before the storm, tree planting was a priority for our city. Not only do city trees help make our streets beautiful, they help make Salt Lake City more resilient.

Urban forests are critical parts of green infrastructure, providing natural air and water filtration, mitigating the Urban Heat Island effect, and helping with carbon drawdown. As a result, trees can help make Salt Lake City a pleasant and climate resilient community.

Want to learn more about Salt Lake City’s urban forest and how you can help support our trees? Read on!

Trees vs. Climate Change

The green infrastructure provided by trees provides something we all love in the summer: shade. According to the EPA, the maximum temperatures of shaded surfaces can be between 20–45°F cooler than unshaded areas. This is especially important in cities where buildings, roads, and city infrastructure absorb the daytime heat. The absorbed heat effectively warms the entire city, making cities warmer than surrounding areas resulting in what is called an Urban Heat Island.

By making cities a little cooler in the summer, trees and vegetation help us cut down on the energy we use to cool buildings – and the associated carbon use and pollution. Trees are also able to help filter the air pollutants and sequester the carbon dioxide that we do produce. The EPA also notes that trees absorb rainwater, which is an important part of protecting our stormwater.

Recognizing these benefits is one reason why Salt Lake City has a long-term Urban Forest Action Plan. Check out the video from last year’s Summer Planning Series, which discussed the benefits of trees and how the City is working to increase our canopy to serve our entire community.

Watch the video from the 2019 Summer Planning Series walking tour on our SLC Urban Forest.

​Caring for the Urban Forest 

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Volunteer this Saturday at the EcoGarden!

EcoGarden Party

Volunteer this Saturday, October 4!

EcoGarden & Orchard Cleanup
Day Riverside Library (1575 W 1000 North)
10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
All ages welcome!

Register at http://bit.ly/treeutah

Volunteer to Plant Trees in Alta

albionbasin_flickr_lemonjenny

Photo Credit: Lemon Jenny via Flickr.

Looking for an excuse to spend the morning in the mountains? Volunteer to help plant trees in Alta with Tree Utah!

Trees are vital not only to the beauty of the mountains, but to the health of our watersheds and the operation of resorts like Alta Ski Area.

Tree Utah invites you to discover a whole new side of Alta Ski Area by joining them to plant 2,000 trees on September 6th, 2014! Both rugged and rewarding; it will be a fun day to enjoy and give back to the beautiful Little Cottonwood Canyon.

When: Saturday, September 6th, 2014 from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Registration is REQUIRED, so please reserve your spot!
Where: Albion Grill, Alta Ski Area

A light breakfast will be provided including donations of coffee and tea from Starbucks and bagels from Einstein Bagel. The Albion Grill will be offering 25% off food for volunteers to enjoy lunch after planting.

100 volunteers are needed, ages 14+, and online registration is required because as they need to know the hiking abilities of the volunteers. Some groups will ride lifts and some will hike to plant, but all will be in rocky mountain terrain.

What to Bring:

  • Sturdy close toed hiking shoes or boots
  • Clothing appropriate for conditions (long pants and quick dry materials that can get dirty and take wear and tear are suggested)
  • A backpack to carry your refillable water bottle, snacks or other needed items
  • Gloves if you prefer to have your own

RSVP and invite your friends on Facebook!