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Posts tagged ‘resources’

Environmental Justice and Equity Resource Guide

Parents Jami and Mohamed discuss the importance of involving your community when talking about race and racism with your kids. See the video and full series of conversations at PBS Utah.

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Sustainability encompasses both environmental action and efforts to build just and equitable communities. Indeed, climate change and pollution disproportionately affect people of color around the world. Therefore, the work of environmental justice is directly tied to equity and social justice.

The connections between sustainability and equity have often gone unnoticed or even been rejected. Nevertheless, the links between systemic racism and environmental injustice are undeniable.

Better understanding these links can help us all work towards building a more equitable and sustainable society. We’ve been delving even deeper into this work and these connections in the last few weeks and wanted to share what we’re reading and learning. Here are some resources we’ve found helpful:

  • PBS Utah put together this short conversational series How to Talk to Kids about Race, featuring several people from our SLC community you might recognize.
  • Somini Segupta wrote an expansive guide entitled Read Up on the Links between Racism and the Environment for the New York Times. The reading guide includes everything from hard science to sci-fi, and provides a broad platform for understanding racial injustice in the context of climate.
  • You can also check out a new website co-founded by environmentalists Leah Thomas, Diandra Esparza and Sabs Katz, Intersectional Environmentalist. The site provides information from environmentalists in different communities including Latinx and U.S. Indigenous Communities– communities which have also continued to fight oppression and environmental racism. Intersectional Environmentalist provides extensive reading lists to understand all of the intersections of environmental work. Founder Leah Thomas’ writing was recently featured in Vogue, where she links her work in environmental policy to anti-racism.
Photograph shows mountains with inversion hovering over valley.
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Salt Lake City Searching for New Sanitation Program Director

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Salt Lake City is looking for a new Sanitation Program Director that will help the City achieve it’s goal of zero waste by 2040!

Apply at SLCgov.com.

Position: SANITATION PROGRAM DIRECTOR
Job Code: 001609
Job Bid: 150228
Department: Public Services
Salary: (031) $4,933.00 – $8,538.00
Close Date: 6/4/2015

Directs and manages the City’s operations for the Sanitation Program. As Program Director, incumbent is responsible for managing operations associated with the City’s recycling and waste collection programs, including but not limited to: curbside refuse, compost and recycling collection; neighborhood clean-up; enforcement and education; and container maintenance. Plans, develops and implements city-wide waste diversion and reduction policies and initiatives to meet the City’s goal to reach Zero Waste by 2040.

Position requires specialized knowledge of best management practices for waste diversion, sanitation operations and requires the knowledge and ability to address local challenges.

Plans for and directs operations associated with the delivery of citywide sanitation services, including: curbside refuse, compost and recycling collection; neighborhood cleanup; enforcement and education; and container maintenance programs. Develops and implements strategies for aggressively moving the City towards Zero Waste. Designs, implements, and monitors program including the implementation of best management practices, environmental stewardship, operating budgets, performance measures, personnel and equipment maintenance. Recommends and initiates process improvements, cost saving measures, operational efficiencies and other program changes necessary to achieve Zero Waste.  Directs the preparation and necessary adjustments to the program budget, including the support needed for updates and revisions to the annual budget document. Monitors and manages budget, resources, and financial transactions. Ensures appropriate processes, procedures, and policies are in place and followed for all financial transactions. Analyzes and develops program policies, goals, and objectives to improve efficiency and effectiveness. Creates strategic plans to support the policies, goals and objectives of the program. Resolves complex issues involving operations and environmental stewardship. Ensures operations comply with City, State and Federal regulations to protect the environment and ensure safe work practices. Presents the program’s policies and positions in meetings, negotiations, and communications with the public, citizen and industry groups, Mayor and City Council members, other government agencies, the media and other public forums within assigned area of authority.

Ensures employee productivity and effective use of resources by coaching, mentoring and training supervisory staff and building an effective team. Evaluates and documents performance of program managers and office staff, administers appropriate employee recognition and disciplinary actions. Develops technical specifications, project design and standards for procurement bids and proposals related to sanitation. Reviews bids and proposals and assists with the selection of contractors. Ensures contractor performance. Plays key roll establishing disaster and emergency preparedness program. Represents the department in public meetings and/or on various committees as directed. Performs other duties as assigned.

Minimum Qualifications:

Bachelor’s degree in Public Administration, Business Management or closely related degree, plus six (6) years progressively responsible experience managing public programs including a minimum four (4) years in a supervisory capacity. A combination of six (6) years of directly related program and/or management experience may be substituted for the required education.

Thorough knowledge of materials, techniques, equipment, personnel management and best management practices associated with waste diversion, recycling, resource management, composting, and landfill operations.

Experience in budget preparation and administration, and ability to implement budget requirements into departmental operations.

Ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships with elected officials, department directors, employees, and the general public. Highly effective collaboration and communication skills.

Possession of a valid driver’s license or Utah driving privilege card, including the ability to travel between office and external locations.

Apply at SLCgov.com.

Grow West Garden Fest: Free Family Event April 9 at Sorenson Unity Center

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SAVE THE DATE FOR A FREE FAMILY EVENT
Thursday, April 9 from 6-8 p.m. at the Sorenson Unity Center

The Grow West Garden Fest invites the public to learn about health, nutrition, and gardening resources available to westside Salt Lake City neighborhoods. These resources include community gardens, school gardens, workshops, youth activities, and organizations & businesses that support gardening practices. For attendees who participate in event activities, free food will be served by El Ranchero Chido, a local taco cart.

For more information, visit wasatchgardens.org or check out the Facebook event page.

Wasatch Watershed: Snowflakes to Your Tap

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60% of the water used by residents of Salt Lake City and the Valley’s east bench comes from canyons in the Wasatch Mountains. The Utah Chapter of the Green Building Council is hosting what promises to be a fascinating exploration into the successes and challenges of protecting Salt Lake City’s water.

The Wasatch Front Watershed: Snowflakes to Your Tap
Thursday, September 26 from 4-6 p.m.
Salt Lake City Public Library
Register online or pay at the door.
Questions: programs@usgbcutah.org

In the 1950’s, access to City Creek Canyon, a source of Salt Lake City’s drinking water, was closed to public use for over 10 years due to bacterial contamination, public health concerns and damage to the City Creek Watershed. Lessons learned from this event and the ensuing restoration of City Creek Canyon, as well as other water sources across the nation have informed Salt Lake City’s watershed protection policies for the last several decades.

Join Laura Briefer, Water Resources Manager, for the Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities to learn about Salt Lake City’s role, perspectives, successes, and challenges in protecting the main sources of Salt Lake City’s water supplies in the Central Wasatch Mountains – including recent scientific research and other work regarding climate change impacts on Salt Lake City’s water supply.

The Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities (SLCDPU) is a municipal water supplier responsible for the provision of drinking water to over 300,000 people in the Salt Lake Valley. Laura manages SLCDPU’s Water Resources Division, which includes watershed management, water conservation, hydrology, water rights, and land preservation functions.

The Leonardo UpCycle Project

Our friends at The Leonardo have a very cool project that we just had to share with our readers!

The UpCycle Project takes items destined for the landfill and uses them to fuel innovation and creativity. Residents can drop off their old clutter which will then be up-cycled into a cool Art or Science project. Then stop by The Leo’s Tinkering Garage or the art Lab @ Leo to take part in one of their fun up-cycling activities!

Here’s a sample of items they are able to accept:

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Materials can be dropped off any time during regular business hours. More information is available on their website.

World Water Day 2013

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Today is World Water Day, a day to reflect on the importance of water in our daily lives. This year’s theme is Water Cooperation, in honor of the declaration of 2013 as the International Year of Water Cooperation.

Did you know?

  • 85% of the world population lives in the driest half of the planet.
  • 783 million people do not have access to clean water, and almost 2.5 billion do not have access to adequate sanitation.
  • 6 to 8 million people die annually from the consequences of disasters and water-related disease.

Today, take a moment to appreciate how fresh, clean water impacts our lives. And although we can count ourselves lucky to live in a society that has easy access to safe, clean water, it is important that we do not take this resource for granted. In the arid West, and as climate change’s impacts are felt, water scarcity may become a more pressing issue.

Learn more about what Salt Lake City is doing to adapt to predicted earlier snowmelt along the Wasatch Front. And stop by Salt Lake City Green’s Water Resources page to learn more about our commitment to water quality and conservation.

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