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Posts tagged ‘laura briefer’

Where have all the winters gone? Local consequences of climate change panel discussion

Where have all the winters gone

Where have all the winters gone? Local consequences of climate change
Thursday, April 16 from 7-8:30 p.m.
Malouf Hall 201, Westminster College

Panelists:

  • Laura Briefer, Water Resources Manager, Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities
  • Maura Olivos, Sustainability Coordinator & Ecologist, Alta Ski Area
  • Court Strong, Assistant Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Utah
  • Moderator: Brent Olson, Assistant Professor, Environmental Studies, Westminster College

 

Utah & Climate Change 2015 Series

ClimateChangeFlyerREV011615Clark Planetarium and the Citizens’ Climate Lobby are hosting the Utah & Climate Change series in 2015. Utah & Climate Change is a multi-disciplinary panel discussion series on climate change in Utah, and its role in science, the economy, media and religion featuring experts in these areas.

The series kicks off with The Science & Economic Impacts of Climate Change on Thursday, January 29 at 7:00 p.m. The panel discussion will feature:

  • Rob Davies, a physicist with Utah State University
  • Maura Olivos, sustainability coordinator with Alta Ski Resort
  • Gabriel Lozada, an economist with the University of Utah
  • Laura Briefer, water resource manager with Salt Lake City

Get up-to-date information on the series, including how to get tickets.

Wasatch Watershed: Snowflakes to Your Tap

mountainstream

60% of the water used by residents of Salt Lake City and the Valley’s east bench comes from canyons in the Wasatch Mountains. The Utah Chapter of the Green Building Council is hosting what promises to be a fascinating exploration into the successes and challenges of protecting Salt Lake City’s water.

The Wasatch Front Watershed: Snowflakes to Your Tap
Thursday, September 26 from 4-6 p.m.
Salt Lake City Public Library
Register online or pay at the door.
Questions: programs@usgbcutah.org

In the 1950’s, access to City Creek Canyon, a source of Salt Lake City’s drinking water, was closed to public use for over 10 years due to bacterial contamination, public health concerns and damage to the City Creek Watershed. Lessons learned from this event and the ensuing restoration of City Creek Canyon, as well as other water sources across the nation have informed Salt Lake City’s watershed protection policies for the last several decades.

Join Laura Briefer, Water Resources Manager, for the Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities to learn about Salt Lake City’s role, perspectives, successes, and challenges in protecting the main sources of Salt Lake City’s water supplies in the Central Wasatch Mountains – including recent scientific research and other work regarding climate change impacts on Salt Lake City’s water supply.

The Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities (SLCDPU) is a municipal water supplier responsible for the provision of drinking water to over 300,000 people in the Salt Lake Valley. Laura manages SLCDPU’s Water Resources Division, which includes watershed management, water conservation, hydrology, water rights, and land preservation functions.