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Posts tagged ‘input’

City Invites Residents to Discuss Future Improvements to Foothill Drive

Salt Lake City’s Transportation Division, along with several partner organizations, invite residents and area stakeholders to meet and discuss the future of the Foothill Drive corridor at an open house to be held Thursday, March 31, at 5 pm located at Hillside Middle School, 1825 Nevada Street in Salt Lake City.

The open house marks the beginning of Foothill Drive Implementation Strategy, which will identify short term and long-term priorities to address traffic congestion, improve neighborhood connections, enhance safety, and provide transportation options.

Foothill Drive has long served as a vital urban thoroughfare linking I-80, I-215, and Parley’s Way at the City’s Southeastern border to the Foothill Cultural District and the University of Utah, and eventually Downtown via 500/400 South.

The street also serves as a neighbor commercial corridor and regular users have expressed interest in enhancing the safety, efficiency and aesthetics of the corridor for pedestrians, cyclists, drivers and transit riders.

To learn more about the project and to share your ideas, visit the project website at www.foothilldrive.org, email the project team at foothilldriveslc@gmail.com, join us at the upcoming open house or call the project hotline at 801-535-7130 to provide comment.

 

Who: Salt Lake City Transportation Division, University of Utah, Utah Department of Transportation, Wasatch Front Regional Council, Salt Lake County, Utah Transit Authority

Where:
Hillside Middle School
1825 Nevada Street
Salt Lake City, Utah

When: Thursday, March 31st from 5 p.m. -7 p.m.

 

People with disabilities who would like to request reasonable accommodation to attend this event should provide 48 hours advance notice. Accommodations may include alternate formats, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids. For questions or additional information, please contact Christine Passey, Coordinator for Disability Rights/Special Projects, at christine.passey@slcgov.com, 801-535-7110, or TDD 801-535-6021.

A Blueprint for the Central Wasatch Mountains

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The legacy of the Central Wasatch Mountains, one of Utah’s most valuable resources, could be lost unless action is taken today.

Increasing population and visitation, sprawling development, congestion and a changing climate are putting more and more pressure on these mountains. Mountain Accord was established to make critical decisions designed to address these threats and ensure long-term vitality for generations to come.

After more than a year of researching, collaborating and considering public input,

Mountain Accord has released a proposed Blueprint for the Central Wasatch

that addresses and balances the future of environment, recreation, transportation and economy in the Central Wasatch and proposes specific actions to be made in each area. Now it’s up to you to weigh in on this proposal and help shape the future of the Central Wasatch.

Visit mountainaccord.com between now and March 16 to read the proposed Blueprint and answer a short questionnaire.

Additional opportunities for the public to learn and weigh in are listed below:

Proposed Blueprint Q&A
Wednesday, Feb. 11
6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
Cottonwood High School Auditorium (use north entrance)
5715 South 1300 East Murray, UT 84106

Proposed Blueprint Q&A and Open House*
Tuesday, Feb. 24
Q&A: 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
Open House: 7:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Black Box Theater, Eccles Center for the Performing Arts
1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, UT 84090

Proposed Blueprint Open House
Wednesday, Feb. 25
6:00 – 8:30 p.m.
Skyline High School Cafeteria (use main entrance)
3251 East 3760 South Salt Lake City, UT 84109

*Please note that the Park City event has been rescheduled from Feb. 10.

Comments may also be emailed to comment@mountainaccord.com or mailed to:

Mountain Accord
375 West 200 South, Ste. 275
Salt Lake City, UT 84101

Please take the time to share this post with your friends, family and co-workers. The future of the Central Wasatch is in your hands!

What’s the true cost of solar? Public Service Commission taking comments through Friday

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Residential solar installation (Utah Clean Energy)

In August 2014, Rocky Mountain Power’s proposed $4.65 solar fee was denied by the Public Service Commission pending a cost-benefit analysis of solar. The Public Service Commission agreed with Utah Clean Energy that Utah’s net metering law requires an evidentiary finding that the costs of Utah’s net metering outweigh its benefits, or vice versa, before the Commission can approve a rate change specifically for net metering customers. The Commission opened an investigation into the costs and benefits of Rocky Mountain Power’s net metering program, which is now underway. (source: Utah Clean Energy)

The Utah Public Service Commission is requesting comments by Friday, February 6th on the cost-benefit criteria that should be used. The Commission is specifically asking for input on four points, details are available on the Commission’s website.

Solar is a clean, renewable source of energy that has many benefits to the community, including social, environmental and economic benefits. Salt Lake City will be submitting comments encouraging a holistic assessment that includes these benefits.

Docket information, including previously submitted Public Comment, are available online.

Rules for submitting formal Public Comment (e.g., Original plus 10 copies provided to Commission) are also available online. Hard copies should be sent to:

Utah Public Service Commission
Heber M. Wells Building
160 East 300 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84114