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Posts tagged ‘food waste’

Climate Week: Steps to Eliminate Food Waste

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Today is World Food Day. World Food Day is a day of action against hunger. On October 16, people around the world come together to declare their commitment to eradicate hunger in our lifetime. Because when it comes to hunger, the only acceptable number in the world is zero.

Reducing food waste is an important component of climate action at home and worldwide.

Worldwide Food Waste Facts

  • Every year, consumers in industrialized countries waste almost as much food as the entire net food production of sub-Saharan Africa (222 million vs. 230 million tons)
  • The amount of food lost and wasted every year is equal to more than half of the world’s annual cereals crops (2.3 billion tons in 2009/10)
  • More facts

North American Food Waste Facts

  • In the USA, organic waste is the second highest component of landfills, which are the largest source of methane emissions
  • In the USA, 30-40% of the food supply is wasted, equaling more than 20 pounds of food per person per month
  • More facts

So what can you do? Here are the recommendations from the United Nations Environment Programme, Regional Office of North America:

Think. Be a smart shopper and think about what you are buying and when it will be eaten. Wasting food is often a subconscious act – become aware of how much food you throw away. Plan meals and use shopping lists. Bring your leftovers home from restaurants in reusable containers.

Eat. Become a more mindful eater. Eyes bigger than your stomach? Request smaller portions and become a leftovers guru.

Save. Save your food, save your money and save the environment. Donate to food banks and become a conscious consumer.

Learn more at FoodDayUSA.org.

e2 Business Best Practice: Future of Food Waste

On Tuesday, e2 Business members gathered at the Central Valley Water Reclamation facility to learn about anaerobic digestion and how it can help solve the long standing issue of what to do to “recycle” food waste and prevent it from ending up in our valley’s landfills. And by food waste they mean just about anything — from bread, to fish, to expired milk and everything in between!
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Glen Perry is Vice President of ALPRO Energy & Water, the project development firm that has partnered with Momentum Recycling and Central Valley Water Reclamation facility to develop the proposed food waste anaerobic digester.

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The group noshed on delicious vegan sandwiches, salads and burritos from Bud’s Sandwich Company as they learned the ins and outs of anaerobic digestion (and its similarities to human digestion — interesting lunch talk!)

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Kate Whitbeck with Momentum Recycling shared how their organization plans to play a roll in providing the “feedstock” for the anaerobic digester in the form of post-consumer food waste, primarily from restaurants.

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Following the discussion, the group took a tour of the Central Valley Water Reclamation facility, highlights including a rooftop view of the reactors and waste digesters. Learn more about the waste operations at the facility.

Green your business with the help of Salt Lake City’s e2 business program!

Five Quick Tips for a Greener Thanksgiving

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Thanksgiving is a time for gratitude, delicious food and great company. Unfortunately this most American of holidays can generate a lot of waste: food waste, disposable plates, plastic utensils and cups, and wasted energy.

Here are five quick tips to reduce waste and focus on the things that matter.

1. An Organic Bird: When it comes to buying the holiday turkey, we recommend buying an organic bird. Look for labels saying, “USDA certified organic” or “No Antibiotics Administered” with a “USDA Process Verified” seal. e2 Business Liberty Heights Fresh offers some great options.

2. Local Sides: Swing by the Winter Farmers Market this Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Rio Grande Depot to pick up local greens, squash, root vegetables, etc. Also, think about minimizing your use of meat in recipes — vegetarian dishes have a lower carbon footprint. For recipe suggestions, visit our Green Thanksgiving Pinterest board.

3. Durable Tableware: We understand the temptation, but please resist the urge to purchase single-use table settings. After their one use, they go right to the landfill where they take years to degrade (if they ever!) If you’re hosting, ask your guests to pitch in to help wash dishes. If you’re headed to a celebration away from your home, pack up some silverware, plates, and cups (or a water bottle) and bring them along. The extra ten seconds it takes to pack up your own dishes saves landfill space and energy.

4. Creative Leftovers: Thanksgiving dinner is wonderful, but we all know that there is plenty of food left over after the big meal. If you’re planning to take some leftovers home with you, bring along a few empty glass food containers from home, which will eliminate the need for disposable containers. You can also minimize food waste by turning your turkey, potatoes, stuffing, and other foodstuff into innovative leftover recipes. Dispose of spoiled fruits and vegetables food in a compost bin.

5. Compost and Recycle: For those hosting Thanksgiving meals, be sure to clearly mark bins for recycling and composting. This will eliminate the build-up of trash in your home and will keep unnecessary waste out of the landfill.

For more information, visit these websites:

FruitShare Volunteers Needed this Saturday!

SLC FruitShare helps to minimize food waste, promote local food production, and enhance the community’s knowledge of fruit trees by engaging local fruit tree owners.

Throughout the year, fruit trees are pruned, thinned and the fruit is then picked and donated to non-profits working on sustainable food and hunger issues (Utahns Against Hunger and Green Urban Lunchbox).

We are in great need for volunteers this Saturday! SLCgreen will hold a FruitShare Event on May 17th from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Volunteer teams will help thin fruit on apricot trees in the Sugar House and East Bench neighborhoods. Thinning fruit will help the trees grow strong, healthy fruit throughout the rest of the season and allow us to come back later this year and pick a greater yield.

No experience is necessary – training will be done with volunteers on site.

To sign up, please contact Lauren Aguilar.