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Posts tagged ‘economy’

Paying for Poor Air: The Cost of Regional Air Pollution

By SLCgreen intern Kelbe Goupil

Air quality, air quality, air quality…will we ever stop talking about it? Until our air is consistently clean and no longer putting our health and economy at risk, probably not.

Bad air day in Salt Lake City

Talking about air pollution is important to us here at SLCgreen, not only because of how harmful it is to our health but also because of how expensive it is.

Let’s face it: bad air is damaging our economy. And not just in Utah. Air pollution in the U.S. costs the nation at least $131 billion in damages annually, including higher healthcare costs. Globally, the cost of pollution-related death, sickness, and welfare is $4.6 trillion per year, which is about 6.2% of the global economy.

Let’s talk about why that is and what can be done about it. 

Read more

The Future of the Central Wasatch Mountains Comments Due March 16th!

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Clean water, open space, and the beauty of nature—the qualities valued most in the Central Wasatch.

This valuable and pristine natural resource is facing pressure from increasing population and visitation, sprawling development, and changing climate. On peak days, the Central Wasatch supports 50,000+ visitors. Annually, there are 5.7 million visitors—this is more than the annual number of visitors to the Grand Canyon and nearly twice the number of annual visitors to Zion National Park! Mountain Accord was established as a collaborative effort to make critical decisions and implement solutions to preserve the Central Wasatch and ensure long-term vitality for future generations.9349348438_bcb4dc87c1_k

Here are some of their ideas:

  • Secure protections on federal lands to provide permanent and predictable management, and work with ski areas to place lands into public ownership.
  • Broaden watershed protections.
  • Protect key wildlife corridors
  • Connect the regional trail network for recreation
  • Generate sustainable economic growth to reinvest in the Central Wasatch
  • Expand transit services to potentially include:
    • Mountain Light Rail service in Little Cottonwood Canyon and possibly full corridor service all the way to Kimball Junction. This would be made possible by one tunnel between Little Cottonwood and Big Cottonwood and another tunnel (or aerial transportation) between Big Cottonwood and Park City.
    • Millcreek shuttle service
    • Year-round Big Cottonwood bus service

Over the last year, Mountain Accord has worked to develop goals and define an “ideal” future for each system: environment, recreation, economy, and transportation. Their plans are summarized in a blueprint that is open for public review and comment until March 16. The blueprint contains several links to more detailed documents. Consider reviewing these documents for additional information and to develop a comprehensive response.

Visit: mountainaccord.com/get-involvedMA_Poster_020415

Comments may be emailed to comment@mountainaccord.com or mailed to:

Mountain Accord

375 West 200 South, Ste. 275

Salt Lake City, UT 84101

Please take the time to share this with others.  It is the future of the Central Wasatch!

A Blueprint for the Central Wasatch Mountains

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The legacy of the Central Wasatch Mountains, one of Utah’s most valuable resources, could be lost unless action is taken today.

Increasing population and visitation, sprawling development, congestion and a changing climate are putting more and more pressure on these mountains. Mountain Accord was established to make critical decisions designed to address these threats and ensure long-term vitality for generations to come.

After more than a year of researching, collaborating and considering public input,

Mountain Accord has released a proposed Blueprint for the Central Wasatch

that addresses and balances the future of environment, recreation, transportation and economy in the Central Wasatch and proposes specific actions to be made in each area. Now it’s up to you to weigh in on this proposal and help shape the future of the Central Wasatch.

Visit mountainaccord.com between now and March 16 to read the proposed Blueprint and answer a short questionnaire.

Additional opportunities for the public to learn and weigh in are listed below:

Proposed Blueprint Q&A
Wednesday, Feb. 11
6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
Cottonwood High School Auditorium (use north entrance)
5715 South 1300 East Murray, UT 84106

Proposed Blueprint Q&A and Open House*
Tuesday, Feb. 24
Q&A: 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
Open House: 7:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Black Box Theater, Eccles Center for the Performing Arts
1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, UT 84090

Proposed Blueprint Open House
Wednesday, Feb. 25
6:00 – 8:30 p.m.
Skyline High School Cafeteria (use main entrance)
3251 East 3760 South Salt Lake City, UT 84109

*Please note that the Park City event has been rescheduled from Feb. 10.

Comments may also be emailed to comment@mountainaccord.com or mailed to:

Mountain Accord
375 West 200 South, Ste. 275
Salt Lake City, UT 84101

Please take the time to share this post with your friends, family and co-workers. The future of the Central Wasatch is in your hands!

Help Shape the Future of the Wasatch Mountains!

Photo Credit: Steve_W via Flickr.

Photo Credit: Steve_W via Flickr.

The Mountain Accord is a collaborative public process to make long-term decisions and take action regarding transportation, environment, recreation, and economy in the central Wasatch Mountains (between I-80 and Little Cottonwood Canyon).

Your input is crucial to this important process! Comments are currently begin accepted on MountainAccord.com until November 20. Respond to a short questionnaire about the ideal scenarios for transportation, environment, recreation and economy.

Mountain Accord Public Comment Period Opens!

Data Competition Tackles Air Quality in Utah

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Utah Geek Events, the Big Data User groups and many other groups have joined forces to learn more about the air quality in Utah. For the past two months, technologists, scientists, air quality experts, and experts from related fields have been gathering information and data with correlations to Utah’s air.

Air quality is a complex problem that influences many aspects of our lives, including our health, economy and quality of life. Part of that complexity is understanding the entire puzzle of our air — why is it bad and how does it really affect our lives?

Get involved!

Now that we have the information to start gaining answers, we need the questions. Teams will be breaking off to compete to create amazing results with the latest technologies in Big Data, but we need your help.

We are looking for ideas of what to look for from the public. We are open to all ideas and suggestions regardless of how far-fetched or mundane they may seem. Feel free to share this survey with others.

Take the survey.

The more questions we have, the more we can start to understand our air and help create a brighter future for Utah.

Learn more at BigDataUtah.org.