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Posts tagged ‘eat local’

Eat Local Week 2019

Whether you are a hardcore “locavore” or you just want to try eating a little more sustainably, taking the Eat Local Week Challenge will help you support the local economy, reduce your carbon footprint, and eat some delicious and nutritious food.

Eat Local logo on image of beets.

What is Eat Local Week?

Eat Local Week Utah challenges you to eat as locally as possible from September 7th to 14th. “Local” typically qualifies as food grown and produced within a 250 mile radius. While it may seem daunting to go without coffee for a week, thanks to the local farmers markets and the events throughout Eat Local Week, there are many ways to participate!

The week’s events include a roster of fun for the whole family starting with Wasatch Community Garden’s Tomato Sandwich Party in the Grateful Tomato Garden. The event serves up free and absolutely fresh pesto and tomato sandwiches. This week you can also support Wasatch Community Gardens and eat fresh, locally grown tomatoes at local restaurants participating in the 2019 Tomato Days.

Other festivities include the Punk Rock Farm to Taco Truck, a Local Spirit Tasting at the Downtown Caputos, and a week-long recipe contest.

Eat Local Week Schedule.
Eat Local Week schedule provided by the Urban Food Connections of Utah.
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Does Central City Need a Community Garden?

If you think the answer is yes, join us next week for an open house on a potential garden at Richmond Park!

Community Garden Open House

When: Thursday, February 28, from 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Where: Central City Recreation Center, Room 134 (615 S 300 E)

Salt Lake City Parks and Public Lands and Wasatch Community Gardens are inviting the public to an open house to discuss local interest and garden design for a potential new community garden in Richmond Park in the Central City neighborhood.

Come learn about the process a new community garden goes through to get approved. We’re also looking for your input what you would like included in the garden design. Finally, we’ll discuss potential impacts it could bring to the neighborhood.

Google Map view of the proposed site
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Urban Food Connections of Utah Brings Local Fare to our City and our Plates

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Welcome to SLCgreen Connections, an occasional series highlighting SLCgreen’s fantastic local partners—the people and organizations with whom we work closely to make Salt Lake City a greener, more vibrant, and sustainable city!

 

by Ardyn Ford, SLCgreen intern and Sophia Nicholas

Salt Lake’s historic Rio Grande Depot houses the Winter Market, an event that brings the city to life every Saturday from November to April. If you haven’t been yet, make a beeline there this week! The market is open through April 21.

Once there, you’ll find tables lined with colorful, fresh produce filling the large hall, while locals bustle around, creating a vivacious energy that stands out against the backdrop of gray days. Read more

Eat Local Week is Back!

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Eat Local Week is back! This fun week, sponsored by a variety of groups including Salt Lake City, is dedicated to helping you eat more local food.

This year there are a number of events that will get you into the local food spirit including lectures, workshops, and even a challenge: Can you eat every meal with food grown or produced in Utah this week?

Food that is produced locally is inherently more sustainable and this event series is a good reminder to take a look at your food habits and consider where your food comes from.

Here’s why it matters: Read more

Salt Lake City Partners with the International Rescue Committee on the City’s first Urban Farm

New Roots participants work the soil and harvest greens on one of the IRC’s other farms.

You may remember our post last February, Salt Lake City Seeking Sustainable Farmers as part of the City’s initiative to provide more opportunities for local farmers to produce sustainable agriculture. Our goal with the Request for Proposals (RFP) for Urban Farming was to work with an area farmer or organization to convert a formerly-vacant 1.5-acre City plot into a productive oasis. In doing so, our aim was to strengthen the community, environment, and well-being of both farmers and nearby residents alike.

We’re thrilled to let you know that the International Rescue Committee was chosen!

The non-profit’s New Roots SLC program, which works with experienced refugee farmers, will transform the currently unused space adjacent to the Sorenson Unity Center into an organic, sustainable, and diversified vegetable farm.

The non-profit currently provides land, technical assistance, and market access for over 30 refugee farmers at other locations around the valley.

We’re pretty excited about this partnership. Here’s a bit more about how New Roots works . . .

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Five Quick Tips for a Greener Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving Turkey

Thanksgiving is a time for gratitude, delicious food and great company. Unfortunately this most American of holidays can generate a lot of waste: food waste, disposable plates, plastic utensils and cups, and wasted energy.

Here are five quick tips to reduce waste and focus on the things that matter.

1. An Organic Bird: When it comes to buying the holiday turkey, we recommend buying an organic bird. Look for labels saying, “USDA certified organic” or “No Antibiotics Administered” with a “USDA Process Verified” seal. e2 Business Liberty Heights Fresh offers some great options.

2. Local Sides: Swing by the Winter Farmers Market this Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Rio Grande Depot to pick up local greens, squash, root vegetables, etc. Also, think about minimizing your use of meat in recipes — vegetarian dishes have a lower carbon footprint. For recipe suggestions, visit our Green Thanksgiving Pinterest board.

3. Durable Tableware: We understand the temptation, but please resist the urge to purchase single-use table settings. After their one use, they go right to the landfill where they take years to degrade (if they ever!) If you’re hosting, ask your guests to pitch in to help wash dishes. If you’re headed to a celebration away from your home, pack up some silverware, plates, and cups (or a water bottle) and bring them along. The extra ten seconds it takes to pack up your own dishes saves landfill space and energy.

4. Creative Leftovers: Thanksgiving dinner is wonderful, but we all know that there is plenty of food left over after the big meal. If you’re planning to take some leftovers home with you, bring along a few empty glass food containers from home, which will eliminate the need for disposable containers. You can also minimize food waste by turning your turkey, potatoes, stuffing, and other foodstuff into innovative leftover recipes. Dispose of spoiled fruits and vegetables food in a compost bin.

5. Compost and Recycle: For those hosting Thanksgiving meals, be sure to clearly mark bins for recycling and composting. This will eliminate the build-up of trash in your home and will keep unnecessary waste out of the landfill.

For more information, visit these websites:

Challenge Yourself to Eat Local!

Get ready to eat local! Eat Local Week returns to Utah on September 6 and runs through September 13.

Eat Local Week celebrates the regional harvest, promotes local agriculture and the preservation of Utah’s agricultural heritage, and bringing people together.

Take the Pledge

The Challenge is simple — eat as local as you can! There are three levels to choose from:

Hardcore: This level will be a challenge-eating only food grown, produced or caught within 250 miles from where you live. This means cutting out some vices that might seem difficult to most. You may have to leave behind your coffee, chocolate, olive oil, booze and fine French cheeses, and you will have to do a little more label reading and research. But finding a deeper connection with your local food resources will make it all worth the effort.

Easy-Does-It: This challenge suggests selecting three vices – maybe coffee, chocolate, and olive oil (or French cheese, Spanish cheese and Vermont cheese), whatever it is you feel you can’t live without, but isn’t produced locally. We also suggest giving yourself a break at this level. We suggest three not-totally-local meal allowances in the week. Maybe you are out with friends or have a business lunch that you can’t skip, allow yourself a little more leniency so you can remain successful.

DIY: For newbies we suggest trying to eat one entirely local meal a day, or consider trying to use one or more local ingredient in every meal you eat for the week. Find something you eat a lot, maybe milk or tomatoes or a grain like wheat and replace your usual brand with a locally made product. Even small changes in your habits can have a huge impact on the producer, environment, economy, flavor, nutrients and you.

Take the pledge now!

Share

Update us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the #eatlocalutah hashtag.

Find an Event

There are a lot of great events taking place during Eat Local Week. Here are a few highlights:

  • Taste Local Utah – Utah State Fair: Join Utah’s Own in celebration of more than 30 locally grown, processed and manufactured products, Sept. 4, noon to 8 p.m., in the Specialty Events Tent at the Utah State Fair.
  • 21st Annual Tomato Sandwich Party: Help us kick-off Eat Local Week, and start you Eat Local Challenge off right at the Tomato Sandwich Party. Enjoy an afternoon at the Grateful Tomato Garden with friends and neighbors and sample our amazing heirloom tomato harvest. We will be serving unique varieties of heirloom tomatoes grown in our Youth Gardens, with pesto made from our homegrown basil, and fresh locally made bread. There will also be live music and fun activities for kids, so bring the whole family. Sept. 6, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Eating Alabama @ Brewvies: In search of a simpler life, a young couple returns home to Alabama where they set out to eat the way their grandparents did – locally and seasonally. But as they navigate the agro-industrial gastronomical complex, they soon realize that nearly everything about the food system has changed since farmers once populated their family histories. A thoughtful and often funny essay on community, the South and sustainability. Sept. 8, 7 p.m.
  • Quickle (Quick Pickle) at the Tuesday Harvest Market. Come make a quick batch of pickles that will taste like summer in a jar! Refrigerator pickles are a fast and easy way to preserve some of the abundant harvest to enjoy in the weeks ahead. We’ll help you make your creation at our booth after you’ve chosen your ingredients from the market. Jars and supplies provided.

Explore all events during Eat Local Week.

Sponsors

Eat Local Week is hosted by Slow Food Utah, Downtown Farmers Market, Utah’s Own, and Wasatch Community Gardens. Learn more at EatLocalWeek.org.