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Posts tagged ‘compost’

Fall is here, keep your street gutters clear!

Street-Gutters-Promo

Look for these signs on Salt Lake City street sweepers this fall

This fall, Salt Lake City is reminding residents to please keep their street gutters clear of leaves and debris.

Our street sweepers are hard at work, but they need your help! By clearing your street gutter of leaves and debris, you will help prevent stormwater drains from clogging, which can result in street flooding, protect water quality and minimize the burden on the sewer system from surface debris.

Salt Lake City residents can also request an extra can for leaves by calling (801) 535-6999 or emailing slcsanitation@SLCgov.com (please include your name, address and phone number).

**Leaf cans are in high demand! If you are done with yours, please call (801) 535-6999 so someone else can use it. Thanks! **

Eat Local Week

Eat Local Week is quickly approaching!  The week of September 12th-19th will be filled with local food events where your participation is strongly encouraged!  A significant part of Eat Local week is the Eat Local Challenge, a fun and exciting way to get a better understanding of where your food comes from. The Challenge is simple, eat as local as you can.

What is local? Try for food within 250 miles from your home. Why?  There are a myriad of reasons.  Eating locally enhances the local economy. Every dollar spent at a locally generates $2.80 of economic activity for our community.  Supporting local farmers has a multiplier effect throughout the local economy as a whole. Local farms generate jobs for the community, farmers’ markets bring customers to surrounding businesses, and they support farmers who are likely to spend money locally on agricultural supplies. (1)  In our conventional food system, farmers receive an average of 20 cents of each dollar spent on food. In a direct-to-consumer market like a farmers’ market or CSA (community supported agriculture share), the farmer receives the direct profit. (2)

Smaller family farms are often more sustainably run than large industrial or factory farms.  “Industrial farming negatively impacts the environment in myriad ways (e.g., by polluting the air, surface water, and groundwater, over-consuming fossil fuel and water resources, degrading soil quality, inducing erosion, and accelerating the loss of biodiversity).  Many small-scale, local farms attempt to ameliorate the environmental damage done via industrial farming by focusing on sustainable practices, such as minimized pesticide use, no-till agriculture and composting, minimized transport to consumers, and minimal to no packaging for their farm products.” (1) Small farms typically grow a variety of crops, adding variation to protect biodiversity and preserve a larger agricultural gene pool. (2)  Local growers can tell you how the food was grown. There is an accountability piece with buying locally produced food, where you can talk directly to farmers and ask about sustainable practices used to grow and harvest the crops.

Fresh food and food that is in season tastes better!  Local food is often more fresh and harvested closer to peak ripeness, with packing, shipping, and shelf-life stages removed.  This contributes to quality and flavor.  On average, in the United States, food travels about 1500 miles from farm to plate.  “Fresh food tends to have more nutrients than food that was picked days or weeks ago,” says Michael Pollan, author of “Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual.” (1) Enjoy Utah’s local food this Eat Local Week!

To learn more about eating locally, visit Eat Local Week Utah’s website.

(1) Grace Communications Foundation.  Local and Regional Food Systems. http://www.sustainabletable.org/254/local-regional-food-systems Accessed Sept. 2, 2015.

(2) Project Open Hand. The Benefits of Eating Locally Grown Foods. http://www.openhand.org/2011/07/20/the-benefits-of-eating-locally-grown-foods/ July 20, 2011.

e2 Business Best Practice: Future of Food Waste

On Tuesday, e2 Business members gathered at the Central Valley Water Reclamation facility to learn about anaerobic digestion and how it can help solve the long standing issue of what to do to “recycle” food waste and prevent it from ending up in our valley’s landfills. And by food waste they mean just about anything — from bread, to fish, to expired milk and everything in between!
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Glen Perry is Vice President of ALPRO Energy & Water, the project development firm that has partnered with Momentum Recycling and Central Valley Water Reclamation facility to develop the proposed food waste anaerobic digester.

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The group noshed on delicious vegan sandwiches, salads and burritos from Bud’s Sandwich Company as they learned the ins and outs of anaerobic digestion (and its similarities to human digestion — interesting lunch talk!)

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Kate Whitbeck with Momentum Recycling shared how their organization plans to play a roll in providing the “feedstock” for the anaerobic digester in the form of post-consumer food waste, primarily from restaurants.

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Following the discussion, the group took a tour of the Central Valley Water Reclamation facility, highlights including a rooftop view of the reactors and waste digesters. Learn more about the waste operations at the facility.

Green your business with the help of Salt Lake City’s e2 business program!

Become a Salt Lake City Master Recycler!

SLC master recyclerSalt Lake City Green is excited to announce our new Master Recycler Program, coming this May! We’re currently looking for our inaugural Master Recycler class.

Do you want to be one of Salt Lake City’s first certified Master Recyclers? Fill out this short form & we’ll be in touch!

What is Master Recycler?

Salt Lake City Green is working to build out a network of residents who are trained and certified Master Recyclers who understand all aspects of waste reduction, city services and bin downsizing options.

Class Details

Master Recyclers commit to attending eight weekly workshops running from May-June 2015. Classes are scheduled for Tuesdays from 3-6 p.m.

Workshops will cover a variety of topics and emphasize opportunities for hands-on learning. Every workshop includes a field trip for a behind-the-scenes look at the Salt Lake County Landfill, Salt Lake City Sanitation, Rocky Mountain Recycling, landfill composting operation and Momentum Glass Recycling. You’ll even “tag” along with Salt Lake City’s can inspection team!

What’s in it for you?

  • Recognition as one of the first certified Master Recyclers in Salt Lake City (awesome plaque included!)
  • A tote bag full of Master Recycler swag, including t-shirt and stainless steel water bottle.
  • The knowledge to help your friends, neighbors and kids maximize your recycling & reduce your impact on the environment.

Sign up! We’re currently recruiting our inaugural Master Recycler class. Fill out this form & we’ll be in touch!

SLC, pick your fee!

SLC, pick your fee (1)

Did you know? Salt Lake City residents can choose their monthly garbage fee, depending on the size of their curbside bin.

There are three options available:

  • $21.00 a month for 90 gallon
  • $17.75 a month for 60 gallon
  • $13.50 a month for 40 gallon

If you are on the fence about downsizing, consider maximizing your curbside recycling and compost (yard waste) bins. The more waste you divert from your garbage bin, the more money you’ll save with a smaller bin & monthly fee!

Learn more at SLCgreen.com.  Or check out our “cheat sheets” below.

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Leaves piling up? Request an extra ‘leaves only’ bin in SLC

Leaves only bin 2014

It’s that time of year! Autumn is upon us, and leaves are starting to fall in Salt Lake City.

Remember that you’re curbside compost (brown) bin is the perfect place to dispose of your leaves on a weekly basis. If you have extra leaves, consider these options:

  • Try composting leaves in your own yard, in a compost bin, or by mulching them into your flower beds or gardens.
  • Rather than a chore to be conquered all at once, rake enough leaves each week just to fill the container.
  • Temporarily store extra leaves in your yard, in a pile, or in a large sturdy container and feed them into your yard waste container each week.

If the leaves are piling up faster than you can handle, extra “leaves only” bins are available to Salt Lake City residents free of charge.

  • Bins are available first come, first served.
  • There is no charge for a “leaves only” bin.
  • Bins are collected weekly, on the same day as garbage collection day.
  • When you are done, call (801) 535-6999 so another resident can use it.
  • All leaves-only bins will be retrieved in early January.

Order your “leaves only” bin by calling (801) 535-6999 or emailing slcsanitation@slcgov.com. Please include your name, address and phone number in your request.

More information is available at www.SLCgov.com/leaves.

Happy autumn!

Recycle Snapshot: Compost

Compost

Status: Brown Bin

Interested in: Soil amendment

Likes: Brown bins, the outdoors, food

About: Earth and I grew up as childhood sweethearts, and we’ve been together ever since. She provides for me, and I give back to her. From eggshells to tea bags, and leaves to coffee grounds, we’re basically the best green team around! You might be surprised by just how much we can actually handle.