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Posts tagged ‘action’

Climate Week: Local Climate Action Receives National Attention

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Under Mayor Ralph Becker’s leadership, Salt Lake City has taken a proactive approach to climate preparedness and resilience. Learn more about the City’s accomplishments and goals on SLCgreen.com.

And that local action has been receiving some national attention! Recently, the White House and U.S. Department of Energy designated Salt Lake City as a Climate Action Champion community. A total of 16 U.S. communities were recognized as inaugural Climate Action Champions.

In March, Mayor Becker was invited to contribute to the White House Blog, touting the progress made right here in Salt Lake City as a national example of success. View “Local Climate Action Takes Center Stage at the National League of Cities Conference.

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A Blueprint for the Central Wasatch Mountains

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The legacy of the Central Wasatch Mountains, one of Utah’s most valuable resources, could be lost unless action is taken today.

Increasing population and visitation, sprawling development, congestion and a changing climate are putting more and more pressure on these mountains. Mountain Accord was established to make critical decisions designed to address these threats and ensure long-term vitality for generations to come.

After more than a year of researching, collaborating and considering public input,

Mountain Accord has released a proposed Blueprint for the Central Wasatch

that addresses and balances the future of environment, recreation, transportation and economy in the Central Wasatch and proposes specific actions to be made in each area. Now it’s up to you to weigh in on this proposal and help shape the future of the Central Wasatch.

Visit mountainaccord.com between now and March 16 to read the proposed Blueprint and answer a short questionnaire.

Additional opportunities for the public to learn and weigh in are listed below:

Proposed Blueprint Q&A
Wednesday, Feb. 11
6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
Cottonwood High School Auditorium (use north entrance)
5715 South 1300 East Murray, UT 84106

Proposed Blueprint Q&A and Open House*
Tuesday, Feb. 24
Q&A: 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
Open House: 7:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Black Box Theater, Eccles Center for the Performing Arts
1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, UT 84090

Proposed Blueprint Open House
Wednesday, Feb. 25
6:00 – 8:30 p.m.
Skyline High School Cafeteria (use main entrance)
3251 East 3760 South Salt Lake City, UT 84109

*Please note that the Park City event has been rescheduled from Feb. 10.

Comments may also be emailed to comment@mountainaccord.com or mailed to:

Mountain Accord
375 West 200 South, Ste. 275
Salt Lake City, UT 84101

Please take the time to share this post with your friends, family and co-workers. The future of the Central Wasatch is in your hands!

Week #1: New Year’s Resolutions Update

Scoreboard_1-3-2014We’re off to a great start in 2014! If you haven’t made a resolution yet, what are you waiting for?

A National Climate Action Plan

Yesterday President Obama delivered a groundbreaking speech on climate change, and unveiled a new Climate Action Plan for the country. The plan takes action to:

  • Cuts Carbon Pollution in America. In 2012, U.S. carbon pollution from the energy sector fell to the lowest level in two decades even as the economy continued to grow. To build on this progress, the Obama Administration is putting in place tough new rules to cut carbon pollution—just like we have for other toxins like mercury and arsenic —so we protect the health of our children and move our economy toward American-made clean energy sources that will create good jobs and lower home energy bills.
  • Prepares the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change. Even as we take new steps to cut carbon pollution, we must also prepare for the impacts of a changing climate that are already being felt across the country.
  • Lead International Efforts to Address Global Climate Change. Just as no country is immune from the impacts of climate change, no country can meet this challenge alone. That is why it is imperative for the United States to couple action at home with leadership internationally. America must help forge a truly global solution to this global challenge by galvanizing international action to significantly reduce emissions, prepare for climate impacts, and drive progress through the international negotiations.

Read the full Climate Action Plan to get all of the details (PDF).

Join the conversation on Twitter with the #ActOnClimate hashtag.

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Mayor Becker, SLC Sign on to Resilient Communities

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Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker has joined 45 other mayors and county officials from around the country who have committed to creating more resilient cities, towns and counties in response to our nation’s growing extreme weather and energy challenges.

As an Inaugural Signatory of the Resilient Communities for America campaign, Mayor Becker is among the first local elected officials in the nation to showcase his leadership on these key issues testing America’s communities.

resilientcommlogoThe national campaign, which launched today, recognizes that local governments like Salt Lake City are on the front lines of responding to increasing disasters and disruptions fueled by a changing climate. An unprecedented increase in heat waves, droughts, floods, severe storms and wildfires have devastated communities nationwide over the past two years and cost America $188 billion in damages.

The Resilient Communities for America campaign seeks to champion the work of Mayor Becker, Salt Lake City and other local governments at the forefront of the emerging national movement to build resilience – and to inspire hundreds more to follow their lead. Every $1 spend on disaster risk reduction can save $4 in recovery and emergency response costs – make resilience efforts a sound investment for our community.

Local Impacts for Salt Lake City

  • Long-term trends show that as warming occurs, less precipitation is falling as snow in surrounding watersheds, which means diminished snowpack water storage for Salt Lake City. In addition, recent climate studies show that the timing of water runoff will shift to earlier in the season, creating challenges during peak summer water demand.
  • Increases in temperature and changes in precipitation will impact water supply and water demand. One recent study indicates that Salt Lake City’s watersheds in the Wasatch Mountain range could see an overall average of 3.8% reduction in stream flow per one degree Fahrenheit. Almost all of Salt Lake City’s water supply emanates from these local Wasatch Mountain watersheds.
  • In recent years, trees in the urban forest are becoming more susceptible to disease due to warming.
  • Lower precipitation and warmer temperatures are causing changes to forests and vegetation, increasing the danger of area wildfires, and increasing the threat of water quality degradation.

Local Actions Being Taken by Salt Lake City

  • LeoSolar600pxLong-term master plans for the city will incorporate likely future climate scenarios, including the City’s Water Resource Planning efforts.
  • Infrastructure Planning: Roads, storm drains and other critical infrastructure will need to handle extreme weather events such as heat waves and greater storm intensity.
  • Energy Security: To minimize energy demand, especially during heat waves, the City is focusing on energy efficiency upgrades, develop net zero buildings and expanding local renewable energy sources, such as solar PV and solar hot water systems.
  • Efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions include energy efficiency projects and transit-oriented development projects to minimize vehicle trips.

Learn More

Find Resilient Communities for America on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.